Whole-body hyperthermia-induced thermotolerance is associated with the induction of heat shock protein 70 in mice

Yueh Tsu King, Chih-Sheng Lin, Jyh Hung Lin, Wen Chuan Lee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Molecular mechanisms of whole-body thermotolerance (WBT) in mammals have not been investigated thoroughly. The purpose of this study was to assess the induction of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) and antioxidant enzyme activity in animal WBT, which was induced by whole-body hyperthermia (WBH) in mice. As a preconditioning treatment, WBH was applied to mice to induce WBT. Synthesis of inducible HSP70 (HSP70i) and quantification of its increased level in liver were investigated by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. HSP70i synthesis in mice liver was induced by non-lethal WBH (41°C, 30 min). When compared to control animals, the level of liver HSP70i increased substantially (by 3.6-fold; P<0.0001). When exposed to 30 min of hyperthermia preconditioning, and after recovery for 48 h, the survival rate was 88.2%, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (37.5%; P<0.01). Moreover, the survival rate of animals subjected to preconditioning for 15 min was 72.2%, which was also significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). In contrast, the survival rate of animals subjected to preconditioning for 45 min was 63.5%, which was not different from the control group. Nonetheless, the protection index of the group subjected to 15 min and 30 min of preconditioning was 1.93 and 2.37, respectively. Furthermore, to assess their contributions to WBT, the activities of antioxidant enzymes were also measured. After 48 h of recovery in preconditioned animals, hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, had not changed significantly. To study the molecular mechanism of WBT, we successfully developed a mouse model and suggest that, rather than the activities of antioxidant enzymes, it is HSP70i that has a role to help animals survive during severe heat stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-278
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume205
Issue number2
StatePublished - 19 Aug 2002

Keywords

  • Antioxidant enzyme
  • HSP70
  • Heat shock protein 70
  • Mouse
  • Preconditioning
  • Whole-body thermotolerance

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