Understanding purchase intention during product-harm crises: Moderating effects of perceived corporate ability and corporate social responsibility

Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu Chuan Chen, Chou Kang Chiu*, Wan Yu Lee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

135 Scopus citations

Abstract

A company's product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e. g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study's proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative publicity on trust and affective identification are moderated by perceived CA and CSR, respectively. Empirical testing using a survey of car users from 477 working professionals confirms most of our hypothesized effects except the insignificant moderating effects of perceived CA. Finally, managerial implications and limitations of our findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-471
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2011

Keywords

  • affective identification
  • corporate ability
  • corporate social responsibility
  • purchase intention
  • trust

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