Ultra-high thermal-stable glass phosphor layer for phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes

Chun Chin Tsai, Wei Chih Cheng, Jin Kai Chang, Li Yin Chen, Ji Hung Chen, Yi Cheng Hsu, Wood Hi Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

A glass phosphor layer with ultra-high thermal stability appropriate for phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (PC-WLEDs) is demonstrated. The results showed PC-WLEDs utilizing the high thermal stable glass phosphor maintained good thermal stability in lumen, chromaticity, and transmittance characteristics under the thermal aging condition up to 350 °C. This is a considerable high operating temperature for a phosphor layer in the PC-WLEDs. The lumen degradation, chromaticity shift, and transmittance loss in the glass-based PC-WLEDs under thermal aging at 150 °C , 250 °C , 350 °C , and 450 °C are also presented and compared with those of silicone-based PC-WLEDs under thermal aging at 150 °C and 250 °C. The result clearly demonstrated that the glass-based PC-WLEDs exhibited better thermal stability in lumen degradation, chromaticity shift, and transmittance loss than the silicone-based PC-WLEDs. The advantages of glass encapsulation in high-temperature operation of the PC-WLEDs could be explained that the glass transition temperature of the glass phosphor (567 °C) was much higher than it of silicone (150 °C). The newly developed ultra-high thermal-stable glass is essentially critical to the application of LED modules in the area where the high-power, high-temperature and absolute reliability are required for use in the next-generation solid-state lighting.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6461974
Pages (from-to)427-432
Number of pages6
JournalIEEE/OSA Journal of Display Technology
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Chromaticity shift
  • glass phosphor
  • lumen degradation
  • transmittance loss

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