The predictive validities of individual working-memory capacity profiles and note-taking strategies on online search performance

Jiun Yu Wu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Online search involves multitasking and may demand better working-memory capacities (WMC) and additional cognitive aids. Given the constraints of human cognition, we tested the effectiveness of note-taking strategies on university students' online search performance. Also examined were the profile configurations of WMC tests in silence and in irrelevant speech as well as its interaction effects with note-taking strategies on online search performance. Among the participants of 60 university students, we found a four-group WMC profile composition that differed significantly across WMC scores in both silence and irrelevant speech. Results showed that WMC profiles, note-taking groups and their interaction effect were significant factors on online search performance. Both Free Note and Matrix Note were beneficial for the students in low silent WMC profile groups. Study results have both theoretical and practical implications, advancing our understanding of the interrelationship of WMC under different conditions and informing instructional practice of online search performance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Learning
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • digital distraction
  • multitasking
  • note-taking
  • online search
  • profile analysis
  • working memory

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