The impact of recurrent on-line synchronous scientific argumentation on students' argumentation and conceptual change

Chien Hsien Chen*, Hsiao-Ching She

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study reports the impact of Recurrent On-Line Synchronous Scientific Argumentation learning on 8 th grade students' scientific argumentation ability and conceptual change involving physical science. The control group (N=76) were recruited to receive conventional instruction whereas the experimental group (N=74) received the Recurrent On-Line Synchronous Scientific Argumentation program for about 25 physical science class periods of 45 minutes each, which is about one third of the physical science class periods in a semester. Results indicate that the experimental group significantly outperformed the conventional group on the post-Physical Science Conception Test and the Physical Science Dependent Argumentation Test. The quantity and quality of scientific arguments that the experimental group's students generated, in a series of pre- and post-argumentation questions, all improved across the seven topics. In addition, the experimental group's students successfully constructed more correct conceptions from pre- to post-argumentation questions across the seven topics. This clearly demonstrates that the experimental group's students' argumentation ability and conceptual change were both facilitated through receiving the Recurrent On-Line Synchronous Scientific Argumentation program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-210
Number of pages14
JournalEducational Technology and Society
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - 3 Aug 2012

Keywords

  • 8 grade students
  • Conceptual change
  • On-line Synchronous argumentation
  • Physical science
  • Recurrent online learning
  • Scientific argumentation

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