Test-retest reliability of the San Diego odor identification test and comparison with the brief smell identification test

Elizabeth M. Krantz*, C. R. Schubert, D. S. Dalton, W. Zhong, Guan-Hua Huang, B. E.K. Klein, R. Klein, F. J. Nieto, K. J. Cruickshanks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study described the San Diego Odor Identification Test (SDOIT) reliability and compared the SDOIT and the Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT). Ninety participants aged 50-70 years completed this 2-visit olfaction study. During visit 1, the SDOIT and B-SIT were administered according to standard protocols. Three weeks later, participants returned to retake the SDOIT. The SDOIT score was the total number of odorants correctly identified out of 8 odorants presented, and olfactory impairment was defined as correctly identifying less than 6 odorants. The B-SIT score was the total number of odorants correctly identified out of 12 odorants presented, and participants correctly identifying less than 9 odorants were categorized as abnormal. The SDOIT reliability was high (concordance correlation coefficient = 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79-0.91). The same score was obtained on retest for 73% of participants, whereas 18% improved, and 9% declined. Test-retest agreement was 96% for the SDOIT; 4% improved from impaired at visit 1 to unimpaired at visit 2. Overall, SDOIT impairment classification and B-SIT abnormal classification agreed in 96% of participants (κ = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.63-0.99). In conclusion, the SDOIT showed good test-retest reliability. Agreement for impaired/ abnormal olfaction was demonstrated for the SDOIT and the B-SIT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-440
Number of pages6
JournalChemical Senses
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Impairment
  • Methods
  • Olfaction

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