Study of brain responses to changes in bladder continence and micturition using near infrared spectroscopy

Cho Pei Jiang*, Chia-Wei Sun, Yuh Ping Tong, Chen Li Cheng

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Knowledge of how changes in urinary bladder continence and micturition affect brain activity is important for understanding brain mechanisms. It was reported the experimental results by PET that increased brain activity related to increasing bladder volume was seen in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), in the midline pons, in the mid-cingulate cortex and bilaterally in the front lobe area. Increased brain activity relating to decreased urge to void was seen in a different portion of the cingulated cortex, in premotor cortex and in the hypothalamus. This study used near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to verify brain activity associated with bladder continence and micturition. Two healthy male (right-handed) aged 30 years will be tested as compared with reported results.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSecond Asian and Pacific Rim Symposium on Biophotonics - Proceedings, APBP 2004
Pages173-174
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2004
EventSecond Asian and Pacific Rim Symposium on Biophotonics, APBP 2004 - Taipei, Taiwan
Duration: 15 Dec 200417 Dec 2004

Publication series

NameSecond Asian and Pacific Rim Symposium on Biophotonics - Proceedings, APBP 2004

Conference

ConferenceSecond Asian and Pacific Rim Symposium on Biophotonics, APBP 2004
CountryTaiwan
CityTaipei
Period15/12/0417/12/04

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