Speech recognition for cochlear implant users in the noisy environment: The role of envelope and fine structure

Y. C. Lee, Y. H. Lee*, Charles T. M. Choi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Sound signal can be decomposed to a slowly varying envelope cue and a rapidly varying fine structure cue. These cues can help people to sound perception, sound lateralization, speech recognition in noise, and so on. Cochlear implant can help people with hearing loss to hear the sound. However, there are still many restrictions with cochlear implant user and a gap between normal hearing and cochlear implant user. This study investigated the contribution of envelope and fine structure cues with different SNR and simulated cochlear implant in Taiwanese mandarin speech recognition in noise. Ten normal hearing subjects participated in this experiment. Our result shows sentence recognition in noise almost depends on the envelope cues, but the fine structure cues still have limited contributions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering
EditorsShyh-Hau Wang, Fong-Chin Su, Ming-Long Yeh
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages174-176
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9783319122618
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015
Event1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering, GCBME 2014 and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2014 - Tainan, Taiwan
Duration: 9 Oct 201412 Oct 2014

Publication series

NameIFMBE Proceedings
Volume47
ISSN (Print)1680-0737

Conference

Conference1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering, GCBME 2014 and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2014
CountryTaiwan
CityTainan
Period9/10/1412/10/14

Keywords

  • Cochlear Implant (CI)
  • Envelope
  • Fine Structure
  • Normal Hearing Test

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