Optical engineering of light-emitting electrochemical cells including microcavity effect and outcoupling extraction technologies

Hai-Ching Su*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEC) have received much scientific interest after the first demonstration in 1995. In addition to enormous progresses in development of novel emissive materials for LECs, charge carrier balance has been improved to significantly enhance device efficiency of LECs. However, further improvement in device performance is still required to meet industrial applications. Optical engineering techniques involving interference, scattering, and waveguiding effects in device optical structures would be feasible approaches to modify the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum and to extract more light output from LECs. In this chapter, the microcavity effect and outcoupling extraction technologies are reviewed in detail. This complements the introduction provided in Chap. 1. Microcavity effect can be employed to tailor the EL spectrum of LECs by adjusting the interference effect. Scattering from microlens array increases light outcoupling from substrates of LECs. Furthermore, color conversion and waveguide coupling result in more light extraction, since both EL trapped in waveguide and substrate mode would be harvested. With these promising techniques, doubled device efficiency can be realized. These results confirm that optical engineering techniques are necessary to achieve highly efficient LECs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLight-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
Subtitle of host publicationConcepts, Advances and Challenges
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages77-92
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9783319586137
ISBN (Print)9783319586120
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Color conversion layer
  • Light outcoupling
  • Waveguiding Microcavity

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Optical engineering of light-emitting electrochemical cells including microcavity effect and outcoupling extraction technologies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this