On the origin of the two-dimensional electron gas at AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions and its influence on recessed-gate metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors

B. Bakeroot*, S. You, Tian-Li Wu, J. Hu, M. Van Hove, B. De Jaeger, K. Geens, S. Stoffels, S. Decoutere

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is commonly accepted that interface states at the passivation surface of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures play an important role in the formation of the 2DEG density. Several interface state models are cited throughout literature, some with discrete levels, others with different kinds of distributions, or a combination of both. The purpose of this article is to compare the existing interface state models with both direct and indirect measurements of these interface states from literature (e.g., through the hysteresis of transfer characteristics of Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor High Electron Mobility Transistors (MISHEMTs) employing such an interface in the gate region) and Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulations of 2DEG densities as a function of the AlGaN thickness. The discrepancies between those measurements and TCAD simulations (also those commonly found in literature) are discussed. Then, an alternative model inspired by the Disorder Induced Gap State model for compound semiconductors is proposed. It is shown that defining a deep border trap inside the insulator can solve these discrepancies and that this alternative model can explain the origin of the two dimensional electron gas in combination with a high-quality interface that, by definition, has a low interface state density.

Original languageEnglish
Article number134506
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume116
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Oct 2014

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