Monodisperse nanoparticle synthesis by an atmospheric pressure plasma process: An example of a visible light photocatalyst

Hsun-Ling Bai*, Chienchih Chen, Chiahsin Lin, Walter Den, Chungliang Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

An atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced nanoparticle synthesis (APPENS) process was proposed to produce a titania-based visible light photocatalyst. The titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) precursor was vaporized with a N2 carrier gas and entered a nonthermal AC plasma system. The N2 gas was dissociated into N atoms by the plasma energy, and then they were doped into the precursor vapors. The produced TiO2-xNx nanoparticles were highly uniform and adjustable in size. The titania-based particle sizes ranged from 25 to 40 nm, and they depended on the precursor ratio of TTIP/H 2O. In addition to producing the photocatalytic particles, the APPENS process has a potential application as a continuous-flow nanosize monodisperse aerosol generator.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7200-7203
Number of pages4
JournalIndustrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Volume43
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 27 Oct 2004

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