Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth

Teruki Sugiyama*, Hiroshi Masuhara

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2878-2889
Number of pages12
JournalChemistry - An Asian Journal
Volume6
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 4 Nov 2011

Keywords

  • crystal growth
  • crystallization
  • nonlinear processes
  • polymorphism
  • proteins
  • INDUCED NUCLEATION
  • AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS
  • POLARIZATION DEPENDENCE
  • PROTEIN CRYSTALLIZATION
  • THERMODYNAMIC ASPECTS
  • PHOTON PRESSURE
  • SPATIAL CONTROL
  • GAMMA-GLYCINE
  • POLYMORPHISM
  • SPECTROSCOPY

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