Kannon: Ubiquitous sensor/actuator technologies for elderly living and care a multidisciplinary effort in National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan

John K. Zao*, Jwu-Sheng Hu, Jin-Chern Chiou, Yu-Lun Huang, Shu Chen Li, Zee Yih Kuo, Ming Chuen Chuang, Shang Hwa Hsu, Yu-Chee Tseng, Jane W.S. Liu, Chin-Teng Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A team of researchers including computer scientists, electrical and control engineers, architects, industrial designers, human factor engineers, and cognitive scientists in the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan, along with their overseas collaborators launched the project Kannon, a multidisciplinary effort to develop Adaptive Assistive Technologies that can be deployed incrementally into existing private/public spaces and collaborate opportunistically to offer monitoring, assisting, communicating and rejuvenating services to healthy elders. The team combined the state-of-art information, communication and robotic know-how with the activity oriented method for product design and the modular functional approach in modern architecture in order to devise a holistic support for successful aging. This paper presents the philosophy, approach and first fruits of this project.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2006 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
Pages4297-4303
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 29 Aug 2007
Event2006 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics - Taipei, Taiwan
Duration: 8 Oct 200611 Oct 2006

Publication series

NameConference Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
Volume5
ISSN (Print)1062-922X

Conference

Conference2006 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics
CountryTaiwan
CityTaipei
Period8/10/0611/10/06

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