Is Paternalistic Leadership a Double-Edged Sword for Team Performance? The Mediation of Team Identification and Emotional Exhaustion

Tse Yao Huang*, Chieh-Peng Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on social identity theory and the conservation of resources theory, this study proposes a research framework to reconcile the arguments in previous findings regarding how paternalistic leadership affects team performance. Data from team workers with a variety of professional expertise and skills across 66 high-tech teams in Taiwan were analyzed. The empirical results of this study demonstrate authoritarianism as a double-edged sword for team performance in which authoritarianism positively relates to team performance through team identification but negatively relates to team performance through emotional exhaustion. At the same time, morality positively relates to team performance through team identification, whereas benevolence positively relates to team performance through emotional exhaustion. Based on the findings, theoretical implications, managerial implications, and research limitations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Leadership and Organizational Studies
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 8 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • emotional exhaustion
  • paternalistic leadership
  • social identity theory
  • team identification
  • team performance
  • the conservation of resources theory

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