Increased risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with depressive disorders: Population-based cohort study

C. S. Lin, Y. S. Lin, C. F. Liu*, S. F. Weng, C. Lin, Bor-Shyh Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the incidence rates and risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among patients with depressive disorders. Method: Data for 27 547 patients with newly diagnosed depressive disorders and 27 547 subjects without depressive disorders between 2001 and 2008 were yielded from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss incidence at the end of 2011 was determined. Cumulative incidence and adjusted hazard ratio were computed. Results: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss incidence was 1.45 times higher in the depressive disorders group compared to the non-depressive disorders group (p = 0.0041), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.460. A significant increased risk of developing sudden sensorineural hearing loss was noted in patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease and hyperlipidaemia (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggest an increased risk of developing sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with depressive disorders. Co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease and hyperlipidaemia significantly aggravated the risk. Depressive disorders might be considered a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss. It remains to be seen whether control of depressive disorders can decrease the incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with depressive disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Laryngology and Otology
Volume130
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Depressive Disorder
  • Hearing Loss, Sudden

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