Functional contact lenses for remote health monitoring in developing countries

N. Thomas*, I. Lähdesmäki, A. Lingley, Yu-Te Liao, J. Pandey, A. Afanasiev, B. Otis, T. Shen, B. A. Parviz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The opportunities afforded by using a functional contact lens for remote wireless health status monitoring are discussed and the progress to date in the development of this technology platform is presented. A functional contact lens complete with sensors and embedded circuitry can be used to monitor the composition of tear fluid and, by extension, a number of health-status related parameters in the body in a noninvasive and continuous fashion. The data collected by the disposable contact lens may be sent wirelessly to a mobile phone that, in turn, can relay the information to a medical practitioner via the cellular phone network. If successfully developed and deployed, such a system can be used for monitoring a variety of health indicators over a large geographic area and population distribution with minimal need for the physical presence of health care providers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2011 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2011
Pages212-217
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2011
Event2011 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2011 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: 30 Oct 20111 Nov 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings - 2011 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2011

Conference

Conference2011 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2011
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period30/10/111/11/11

Keywords

  • Contact Lens
  • Diabetes
  • Glucose Sensing
  • Lactate Sensing
  • Noninvasive Monitoring
  • Real-time Monitoring
  • Wireless Health Monitoring

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