Fostering 5 th grade students' understanding of science via salience analogical reasoning in on-line and classroom learning environments

Ming Hua Chuang, Hsiao-Ching She*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether or not on-line learning (on-line as compared to classroom) influenced the progression of scientific concept construction and analogical reasoning ability; and the degree to which different analogical reasoning (surface and relational salience) contributes to the progression of scientific concept construction and analogical reasoning ability. A total of 190 5 th grade students were assigned to three different conditions: surface salience analogical reasoning without the use of on-line learning (condition 1), the same surface salience analogical reasoning with on-line learning (condition 2), and relational salience analogical reasoning with on-line learning (condition 3). Results indicate that condition 2 significantly outperformed condition 1, regardless of the progression of scientific concept construction and analogical reasoning. Condition 2 performed at the same level that condition 3 did, regardless of the progression of scientific concept construction and analogical reasoning. The stepwise regression indicated that the best predictor for scientific concept construction is analogical reasoning followed by scientific reasoning. This study highlights the idea that on-line learning benefits students more than classroom learning, surface salience analogical.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-118
Number of pages17
JournalEducational Technology and Society
Volume16
Issue number3
StatePublished - 19 Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Image formation of eye
  • On-line learning vs. Classroom learning
  • Relational salience vs. Surface salience analogical reasoning

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