Effects of the number of advertised brands in a choice set: A metacognitive process

Chingching Chang*, Wei Shan Chang, Wan-Yun Yu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

When product shelves feature more advertised brands, such that the choice set likely contains some familiar options, this subjective experience of familiarity could influence consumers' evaluations of chosen products and shopping experiences, through a metacognitive process. The findings of this study suggest that (a) a product shelf displaying some advertised brands, as opposed to no advertised brands, generates greater subjective familiarity, more favorable attitudes toward the purchased items, more shopping satisfaction, and greater intentions to revisit the store; and similarly, (b) a product shelf displaying more, as opposed to fewer, advertised brands generates greater subjective familiarity, more favorable attitudes toward the purchased items, more shopping satisfaction, and greater intentions to revisit the store. These outcomes result from a three-step metacognitive process, whereby the subjective familiarity triggered by the presence of advertised brands influences judgments, through the effect of shopping pleasure. These results are robust for high- and low-involvement products, as well as in contexts in which the prices of the advertised brands are higher than, lower than, or the same as those of the nonadvertised brands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502-519
Number of pages18
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2019

Keywords

  • advertising exposure
  • decision fluency
  • familiarity
  • metacognition
  • processing fluency
  • product display

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