Effects of high-frequency biphasic shocks on ventricular vulnerability and defibrillation outcomes through synchronized virtual electrode responses

Yu An Chiou, Li Kuan Cheng, Shien Fong Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Electrical defibrillation is a well-established treatment for cardiac dysrhythmias. Studies have suggested that shock-induced spatial sawtooth patterns and virtual electrodes are responsible for defibrillation efficacy. We hypothesize that high-frequency shocks enhance defibrillation efficacy by generating temporal sawtooth patterns and using rapid virtual electrodes synchronized with shock frequency. High-speed optical mapping was performed on isolated rat hearts at 2000 frames/s. Two defibrillation electrodes were placed on opposite sides of the ventricles. An S1-S2 pacing protocol was used to induce ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VTA). High-frequency shocks of equal energy but varying frequencies of 125–1000 Hz were used to evaluate VTA vulnerability and defibrillation success rate. The 1000-Hz shock had the highest VTA induction rate in the shorter S1-S2 intervals (50 and 100 ms) and the highest VTA defibrillation rate (70%) among all frequencies. Temporal sawtooth patterns and synchronous shock-induced virtual electrode responses could be observed with frequencies of up to 1000 Hz. The improved defibrillation outcome with high-frequency shocks suggests a lower energy requirement than that of low-frequency shocks for successful ventricular defibrillation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0232529
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

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