Detection of gold nanoparticles using an immunoglobulin-coated piezoelectric sensor

Yu-Shiun Chen, Yao Ching Hung, Kaochao Chen, Guewha Steven Huang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since the existence of nanoparticles in our environment has already attracted considerable attention due to their possible toxic impact on biological systems, the field detection of nanoparticles is becoming a technology that will be much in need. We have constructed a piezoelectric sensor with an antibody-coated electrode. The antiserum can bind gold nanoparticles with a high degree of selectivity and sensitivity. The biosensor thus constructed can detect 4, 5, or 6 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) depending on the coated antiserum. The sensitivity for the detection of 5 nm GNPs was 10.3 +/- 0.9 ng Hz(-1), with the low limit of detection at 5.5 ng. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor was capable of detecting GNPs and other types of nanoparticle, such as ZnO, or Fe3O4. The current study provides, for the first time, a platform for detecting nanoparticles in a convenient, economical manner.
Original languageEnglish
Article number495502
JournalNanotechnology
Volume21
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Dec 2008

Keywords

  • STOKES-RAMAN SCATTERING; IN-VIVO; PARTICLE-SIZE; SURFACE-CHEMISTRY; COLLOIDAL GOLD; TOXICITY; BIODISTRIBUTION; DOPAMINE; NANORODS; GENE

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Detection of gold nanoparticles using an immunoglobulin-coated piezoelectric sensor'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this