Deformation model of consequent slate slopes calibrated to the morphology associated with the rock mass creep

Chia Ming Lo*, Zheng Yi Feng, Meng Chia Weng

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the deformation characteristics of consequent slate slopes in the region between Cuifeng and Wuling in Taiwan. Onsite survey and UDEC numerical models were used to describe the characteristics of gravity-driven deformation under various conditions and identify the process of slate deformation as well as potential failure mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that valley erosion and slope toe soaking mechanisms play key roles in the deformation of slate and accelerate the weakening of slate material. Slate deformation was shown to begin in the tension zone at the cliff top, wherein the slope body slips along the highly inclined foliation, contributing to shear failure or composite failure near the eroded zone of weakness. The phenomenon of foliation opening was widespread within the area of deformation, enabling surface water and groundwater to seep in, thereby accelerating failure in the slate deformation zone.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014
Editors Kaneko, Kodama, Shimizu
PublisherInternational Society for Rock Mechanics
Pages1839-1848
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9784907430030
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014 - Sapporo, Japan
Duration: 14 Oct 201416 Oct 2014

Publication series

NameISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014

Conference

Conference8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014
CountryJapan
CitySapporo
Period14/10/1416/10/14

Keywords

  • Deformation process
  • Onsite survey
  • Slate rock
  • UDEC numerical model

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