Composite analysis of test-well and observation-well data during constant-head test

Yen Ju Chen*, Hund-Der Yeh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

A constant-head test, keeping the buildup or drawdown constant in the test well, is aimed at determining the aquifer parameters. A skin zone around the wellbore due to well drilling or completion has diverse property to the aquifer. Five parameters including the transmissivities and storage coefficients for each of the skin and aquifer zones and the outer radius of the skin zone are determined via the simulated annealing approach to describe the flow system with a finite-thickness skin. Estimated results indicate that analyzing the single-well responses, i.e., test-well flow rate and observation-well drawdown data separately, is insufficient for obtaining accurate estimates for skin and aquifer parameters. Analysis of specific drawdown in an observation well gives biased results in the negative-skin case. The skin and aquifer parameters appear to be accurately determined when the flow-rate and drawdown data are analyzed sequentially or simultaneously.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009
Subtitle of host publicationGreat Rivers
Pages2014-2021
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Oct 2009
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers - Kansas City, MO, United States
Duration: 17 May 200921 May 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
Volume342

Conference

ConferenceWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
CountryUnited States
CityKansas City, MO
Period17/05/0921/05/09

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