Comparing nations in mass communication research, 1970-97: A Critical Assessment of How We Know What We Know

Tsan-Kuo Chang, Pat Pat Berg, Anthony Ying Him Fung, Kent D. Kedl, Catherine A. Luther, Janet Szuba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to assess critically, within the framework of the sociology of knowledge, how we come to know what we know in comparative international communication research. The point of departure is the collective output of comparative international communication enterprise - the published articles in six major communication journals through which theories, methods and findings have been diffused and the cumulated knowledge made possible during the past three decades. A major concern is the general pattern of methodological approaches and epistemological positions as manifested in the existing comparative international communication studies. The common patterns in comparative international communication research include lack of theoretical framework, non-equivalence of concepts and indicators, incomparability of units of analysis and unawareness of Galton's problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-434
Number of pages20
JournalGazette
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2001

Keywords

  • Galton's problem
  • comparative research
  • international communication
  • sociology of knowledge

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