Choice, perceived control, and customer satisfaction: The psychology of online service recovery

Chia-Chi Chang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Service failures and consequent recoveries have been identified as critical determinants of customer retention. Therefore, effective service recovery programs warrant further exploration, particularly in the online shopping environment, where consumers can receive immediate and tangible service recovery. The results of the present study suggest that by providing a choice of recovery options, customers' sense of control is increased, as is their satisfaction with the particular recovery efforts and their overall satisfaction with the entire service experience. Also, service importance accentuated the impact of choice on perceived control. Specifically, when the service was of greater importance, giving customers a choice of recovery options augmented customers' sense of control more than when the service was of lesser importance. The implications of the findings are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-328
Number of pages8
JournalCyberpsychology and Behavior
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2008

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Choice, perceived control, and customer satisfaction: The psychology of online service recovery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this