Characterization of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well nanorods fabricated by plasma etching with self-assembled nickel metal nanomasks

Tao Hung Hsueh, Hung Wen Huang, Chih Chiang Kao, Ya Hsien Chang, Miao Chia Ou-Yang, Hao-Chung Kuo, Shing Chung Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

High-density (3.0 × 1010 cm-2) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanorods were fabricated from an as-grown bulk light-emitting diode structure by inductively coupled plasma dry etching with self-assembled nickel metal nanomasks. The self-assembled nickel metal nanomasks were formed by rapid thermal annealing of a nickel metal film at 850°C for 1 min. The influence of the thicknesses of the Ni metal film on the dimensions and density of the nanorods was also investigated. The structural and optical properties of the InGaN/GaN MQW nanorods were established using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements. The diameters and heights of nanorods were estimated to be 60 to 100nm and more than 0.28μm, respectively. The peak emission wavelength of the nanorods showed a blue shift of 5.1 nm from that of the as-grown bulk. An enhancement by a factor of 5 in photoluminescence intensity of the nanorods compared with that of the as-grown bulk was observed. The blue shift is attributed to strain relaxation in the wells after dry etching, the quantum confinement effect, or a combination of the two, which results in the enhancement of emission intensity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2661-2663
Number of pages3
JournalJapanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers
Volume44
Issue number4 B
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2005

Keywords

  • Gallium nitride (GaN)
  • Inductively coupled plasma (ICP)
  • Nanorods

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