An ultrasensitive nanowire-transistor biosensor for detecting dopamine release from living pc12 cells under hypoxic stimulation

Bor-Ran Li, Ying Jhu Hsieh, Yan Xi Chen, Ya Ting Chung, Chien Yuan Pan, Yit Tsong Chen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

127 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dopamine (DA) is an important neurotransmitter that is involved in neuronal signal transduction and several critical illnesses. However, the concentration of DA is extremely low in patients and is difficult to detect using existing electrochemical biosensors with detection limits typically around nanomolar levels (∼10-9 M). Here, we developed a nanoelectronic device as a biosensor for ultrasensitive and selective DA detection by modifying DNA-aptamers on a multiple-parallel-connected (MPC) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (referred to as MPC aptamer/SiNW-FET). Compared with conventional electrochemical methods, the MPC aptamer/SiNW-FET has been demonstrated to improve the limit of DA detection to <10-11 M and to possess a detection specificity that is able to distinguish DA from other chemical analogues, such as ascorbic acid, catechol, phenethylamine, tyrosine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. This MPC aptamer/SiNW-FET was also applied to monitor DA release under hypoxic stimulation from living PC12 cells. The real-time recording of the exocytotic DA induced by hypoxia reveals that the increase in intracellular Ca2+ that is required to trigger DA secretion is dominated by an extracellular Ca2+ influx, rather than the release of intracellular Ca2+ stores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16034-16037
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume135
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Oct 2013

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