An investigation of inner light during Zen meditation using alpha-suppressed EEG and VEP

Kang Ming Chang*, Chuan Yi Liu, Pei-Chen Lo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sensitivity to light is a common experience during prayer or Zen meditation, in both western and eastern cultures. Higher levels of happiness and lower health insurance costs are typical for those who experience inner light. In this report, the connection between the experience of inner light and Zen meditation is investigated by using EEG and flash visual evoked potential (F-VEP) recorded from the occipital site Oz. EEG results indicate that the experience of inner light during Zen meditation by experienced practitioners is also accompanied by a large amount of alpha-suppressed EEG. The F-VEP data also reflect shorter latency, and indicates a stronger and more sensitive visual response during Zen meditation. These data are also the typical physiological responses when the eyes are open during a rested conscious state, and thus provide a possible closer connection between Zen meditation and the sensitivity of inner light.

Original languageEnglish
Pages656-659
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2005
Event2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: 16 Mar 200519 Mar 2005

Conference

Conference2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period16/03/0519/03/05

Keywords

  • Alpha-suppressed
  • EEG
  • Electroencephalographic
  • F-VEP
  • Inner light
  • Qi
  • Wavelet
  • Zen meditation

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    Chang, K. M., Liu, C. Y., & Lo, P-C. (2005). An investigation of inner light during Zen meditation using alpha-suppressed EEG and VEP. 656-659. Paper presented at 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005, Arlington, VA, United States.